Police shut down Englewood drug market

Chicago Police announced today the arrest of 15 people and the seizure of drugs and cash from what they said was an open-air drug market in the Englewood neighborhood.

"Operation Bleeding Heart," a four-month investigation involving 27 undercover drug purchases, led to the seizure of 88 grams of crack cocaine, 184 grams of marijuana, and $4,799 in cash, police said.

The investigation was prompted by 169 calls to 911 regarding drug sales in the area of 63rd Street between Calumet and Vernon Avenues, and King Drive between 61st and 63rd Streets, an area police say is frequented by members of the Black Disciple and Gangster Disciple street gangs.

Undercover drug purchases were made within 1000 feet of John Dulles Elementary School, Austin Sexton School, and a number of churches, according to a press release.

A sixteen-year-old boy and 11 adults were arrested and charged with criminal drug conspiracy. Three men were arrested and charged with delivery of a controlled substance.

Three other men are being sought by police for their involvement in the market, police said.

Discuss

JOHN, 09-12-2007

I don't understand why people would want to read your site when they can get the exact same thing from the trib and the sun-times, only usually faster with higher quality. i think the idea of what you guys are doing could be really cool and exciting for local journalism, if you actually do something new and exciting. re-writing a police department press release ain't it. but good luck.

GEOFF DOUGHERTY (THE EDITOR), 09-13-2007

John,



I think you'll find that we have a mix of stories on the site -- some you'll see in the Trib, and many that you won't. You'll see more of the latter as we expand our citizen journalism program to the point that we have a volunteer reporter in every Chicago neighborhood.



Meanwhile, when we cover something that is also likely to appear elsewhere, we focus on bringing unique elements to the story. For example, every Chicago news outlet carried a story earlier this summer about a West Side fire that trapped two firefighters. We were the only news organization to interview one of the firefighters, though.



Similarly, we are one of dozens of media organizations writing about the CTA's funding woes. But we were the only one to do the research and document that the agency's new fares are the most expensive in the country.



Just because a story's been done doesn't mean we can't do it better.